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Commercial e-Speaking – Winter 2019

1st June 2019
Commercial e-Speaking – Winter 2019

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Hit the link to the latest edition (Winter 2019) of Commercial eSpeaking
LINK : Commercial-eSpeaking :Issue 52 Winter 2019

A R T I C L E S

The Wellbeing Budget 2019 - If you would like to talk with us about how the Budget may impact you and/or your business, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

PPSR lease losses - Can be a real risk for business - When the Personal Property Securities Register (the PPSR) was established in 1999, most businesses were quick to catch on that it was a good idea to register security over goods that were sold under a line of credit. What wasn’t so easily recognised is that the register was designed to also capture leases of goods that are indefinite or extend past one year.  If you’re unsure if your leases or hire purchase arrangements fall under these circumstances, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Business briefs - Mainzeal case – highlights director responsibilities.  The recent high-profile Mainzeal case has highlighted the importance for directors to know and understand their duties under the Companies Act 1993.  The Mainzeal case is one of many reminders of the importance for directors to understand the obligations that come with their role.

The CLOUD Act: Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data - The Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act was enacted in the United States in 2018. It enables federal law enforcement to force US-based electronic communications or remote computing service providers to disclose requested data in their possession, custody or control, whether or not that data is stored in the US or a foreign country. This is a game-changer for global data sovereignty.  Even though the 2018 Act was passed in the US, it could have serious implications for businesses and individuals in New Zealand.  You may think your sensitive data is safe if it is stored at a data centre located in New Zealand, but that data could be accessed and disclosed if stored through a US-based service provider.

Do you have the right to play the music you’re playing? - A 2018 High Court decision has shown you should consider your right to use a third party’s intellectual property, such as playing music in the course of your business operations.  If you use music or play the radio in a business or public setting that is considered a ‘public performance’ you could be contravening a provision in the Copyright Act 1994. This includes playing music and/or radio broadcasts in any commercial environment, such as a café, restaurant, bar, shop or factory.